Redemption

This coming weekend is an important one for each of the three Abrahamic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam). Jews begin the celebration of the eight-day Festival of Passover on Friday at sundown; most Christians mark Easter on Sunday, April 17; Muslims are in the middle of the holy month of Ramadan.

Although each of these religious traditions is distinct and these holidays are unique, there is a common theme among them: redemption. Redemption is generally described as the action of saving from sin, error, evil, or danger. In Judaism, Passover is the case of redemption par excellence. The Hebrews were saved from slavery in Egypt and brought out into freedom; once they had escaped they received the Torah and were able to worship God properly. In Christianity, Easter celebrates Jesus’ resurrection three days after his death; this represents Jesus’ victory over death and hints at the possibility of eternal life through acceptance of him as Messiah. Jesus is seen as a redeemer oforthose who believe in him. Ramadan is a month of fasting that honors the month in which Islamic scripture, Quran, was first revealed to the prophet, Muhammed. This revelation serves as a proper guide for Muslims of how to live their lives and avoid sin and evil. Redemption is a central theme in each holiday–all being observed at the same time this year!

How is this related to fitness? Many people despair of being able to stay or become physically fit–at any age, but more keenly as we grow older. This is where redemption comes in. The concept means that where we are today (physically, emotionally, spiritually) is not where we need to be forever; we are capable of overcoming obstacles and hardship and rising to a higher level. This is true in fitness at any age. For example, just because a person has problem with balance or walking does not mean that it will always be like that; of course, if no changes are made in behavior the problem will persist, but exercise, proper diet, and sufficient rest can make a huge impact. Focusing on our physical fitness can affect other areas as well. Working out releases hormones that elevate our mood. Additionally, if we are working out with a trainer or in a group setting, we are building relationship. The benefits of keeping physically active are numerous and have been mentioned throughout my blog. Exercise can truly grant us a kind of redemption. Not only that, keeping ourselves fit and healthy better allows us to do what it is that we were put on earth to do. We cannot serve God and humanity if we are too weak, frail, or sick to do so.

Best wishes to everyone for a redemptive season of the year. Chag Peseach Sameach! Happy Easter! Ramadan Kareem!

Fasting and Intermittent Fasting

empty plate

Today on the Jewish calendar is Tisha B’Av, the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av; it is a 25-hour fast that commemorates the destruction of the First and Second Temples in Ancient Jerusalem. Aside from Yom Kippur, it is the only full fast (others just go from sunrise to sunset)…and I’ve got about 6 hours to go.

The goal of the fast (which is the case on Yom Kippur too) is not to lose weight or to suffer greatly, but rather to focus less on the physical and more on the metaphysical. Tisha B’Av causes those who observe it to reflect on the history of the Jewish people: the enemies who have arisen against us from the outside, as well as the enemies from within. Not having to think about eating (which isn’t easy), allows the day to be mostly spiritual, and also gives us a small taste of the suffering of our ancestors.

Interestingly, fasting has been a hot trend in the diet/fitness world the last several years. In particular, a lot of attention has been paid to Intermittent Fasting.

What is Intermittent Fasting? There are several versions. One way to do it is to restrict eating to only certain times of the day (generally an 8-hour period). Others fast one or two days out of the week. Others choose 1-3 days to eat a very restricted calorie count (say around 500 KCals) during the week, and eat normally the rest of the week. The science behind it is that during the fasting periods, the body is required to burn fat in order to maintain its regular functions; in particular, this kind of fasting seems to target belly fat. Other health benefits may include better control of insulin and cholesterol levels.

Why this is appealing to many is that you don’t have to think about calories or only eating certain kinds of food. The process is very simple: eat during certain times and not during others. This can also simplify the dieting process: no need for extensive reading of labels, less meals to plan , etc. Of course, one shouldn’t assume that during non-fasting times root beer floats, corned beef sandwiches and tubs of whipped topping should be the staples of the diet. As always, fruits, vegetables, lean meats, fish and less-processed foods are recommended.

I started doing Intermittent Fasting many years ago not really knowing that it was a “thing.” I noticed that I grazed a LOT after dinner, and it added up to hundreds of calories. I made a rule for myself that I still follow pretty closely: after dinner, no eating! I can drink calorie-free liquids, but that is it. (I do make exceptions for special occasions but don’t go crazy). I found that it helps me control my weight and that my cravings for after-dinner snacks quickly subsided.

There is admittedly a big difference between the kind of religious fasting to which many of us are accustomed (Ramadan, Yom Kippur, etc.), but there is a commonality as well. While one focuses on a physiological goal and the other on a more spiritual goal, both require self-control and self-sacrifice. Both also are means to an end: either greater physical health or greater spiritual awareness.

Readers, I would be interested to know how many of you have tried Intermittent Fasting, or if you currently practice it now. What are the challenges and what are the advantages? What are the results you have seen?

I am a believer–as long as it is done in moderation. Before jumping into Intermittent Fasting, though, do some research and talk to your physician. Be safe and be healthy.

There are many articles on the topic on-line, but a good introduction is: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/intermittent-fasting-guide .

Wishing those observing Tisha B’Av a meaningful fast.