Impossible Whopper Review

I have had a lot of conversations with folks about the Impossible Burger. As a pescatarian (vegetarian who eats fish), I have heard that is as close to the “real thing” as anything out there. Unfortunately, it appears to only be available in certain restaurants, most of which are nowhere near where I live.

On a ride to Columbus, my wife and I were getting hungry; the timing of our drive meant that we hadn’t eaten lunch yet and it was near 3 pm. Then the light bulb went off in my head; Burger King has an Impossible Whopper and there was one at the next exit. We decided to give it a shot.

Let me say that aside from a bathroom stop on a long highway drive and the occasional meal from Subway, I have not been in a fast food establshment in a looooooong time. It was surreal just to walk into a BK in the first place. This place did not hide the Impossible Whopper, but rather prominently featured the plant-based burger on the outside and inside of the store.

So, how was it? It is kind of difficult for me to compare it with real meat since I have not eaten meat in so long that I really don’t remember the taste and texture. Compared with other beggie burgers, however, I have to admit that it was pretty good. It looks a lot like a burger (as does the Griller Prime from Morningstar Farms). What made it so special was that it was served with all the same fixings as a regular whopper; it really felt like eating fast food which is a memory from my pre-teen years.

In terms of how healthy it is, the Impossible Whopper is about 660 calories and the regular Whopper is about 675 so it’s not really a “diet” alternative to the all-beef burger. Leave off the mayo and the bun and would be a lot fewer calories. Also, the manager told us that you can request a “vegan” Whopper that will be cooked in a microwave instead of on the grill–although we were assured that when they grill the Impossible Whopper they clean off the cook top so there isn’t any meat residue; the vegan is also mayonnaise-free.

Would I eat an Impossible Whopper again? If I were on a road trip and looking for something quick to eat on the way, I would definitely consider it. As a regular meal, I don’t think so. The Impossible Whopper is itself not so high in calories, but add the fries and a drink and it’s not the healthiest combo. If you haven’t tried it, though, I recommend you give it a shot. It is good to support businesses that are making more alternatives available to vegetarians.

What a Vegetarian Wants…at Passover

Not this…well, at least not only this.

Passover is not that far away and if you, like me, are planning your menus for the week–and in particular for the Seders–you may be wondering if there are ways to feed your vegetarian guests (or self) that will be satisfying and delicious.

Unfortunately, most web searches turn up recipes that look great but are not necessarily healthy (fried) or that contain little or no protein. Some of them contain dairy products which would traditionally not be served at a meal where meat is being consumed. While others feast on chicken, brisket or salmon, vegetarians often get short shrift. At best it might be a vegetable dish, and at worst: “here Morrie, have some more Karpas!” Just vegetables won’t cut it. Plan ahead now.

Admittedly, finding Kosher for Passover plant-based protein sources is not easy. During the rest of the year, vegetarians often depend on legumes (peanuts, beans, etc.) for their protein, but many Ashkenazi Jews (those of Central and Eastern European descent) do not eat legumes on Passover.

Image result for legumes

Several years ago, the Rabbinical Assembly (the organization of the rabbis of the Conservative Movement) put out a Teshuva (responsum) saying that it is okay for Ashkenazi Jews to eat legumes (called Kitniyot in Hebrew); still there are many who avoid them. To read the responsum, click here:
https://www.rabbinicalassembly.org/sites/default/files/assets/public/halakhah/teshuvot/2011-2020/Golinkin-Kitniyot.pdf. Note that there are also opinions in the Conservative Movement that do not permit Kitniyot.

If you are eating Kitniyot (and so might your guests) many of your problems are solved. Most recipes that are used during the year can be converted to Passover recipes; ask your local rabbi for assistance on this if you are not familiar with the rules.

For those who still do not eat Kitniyot, creativity is called for. Luckily, most authorities (even the most traditional) allow quinoa which is a good source of protein; tree nuts are also allowed. In the coming weeks as Passover approaches, I will share some recipes that I have used and are appropriate to serve to guests at a Passover Seder: fancy, protein-filled, and not too difficult to prepare.

Until then, make sure to ask your guests what their requirements are for Passover so that no one goes home hungry…which is, of course, one of the worst sins you can commit! 🙂