Watch Your Form while You Watch that Screen

Exercise Videos

One of the worries that people have when going to work out at the gym is that they may do an exercise “wrong;” in other words, the form may be off. To the casual exerciser, this may not seem like such a big deal…”so what if my foot is in the wrong place or my back isn’t straight?” Not having the correct form is not only a problem in terms of possibly not getting the full benefit of an exercise, but also it can lead to injury.

This is one of the reasons why people like to work out with a personal trainer–especially if they have injuries or are older. A trainer will ensure that exercises are done properly and help prevent injury. Of course, there are dozens of other reasons to hire a personal trainer, but this is really at the heart of it for many; no one wants to end up worse off than when they started.

It is hard enough to figure out the way to do an exercise correctly at the gym (where you might be able to ask a fitness staff member for assistance, or watch someone else’s form, or even have someone “nicely” correct you). With so many of us avoiding gyms and working out at home, the risk of performing a move incorrectly and possibly injuring ourselves increases. Here is a recent article at http://www.cnn.com that addresses this very issue: https://www.cnn.com/2021/01/22/health/proper-form-common-mistakes-online-workouts-wellness/index.html.

When we are at home, we are often less motivated to work out in the first place. Add to this that we may be watching a video or tuned into a fitness class with a bunch of other people, and it may not be the best recipe for success. The instructor–whether the workout is live or recorded–will often give instructions to help keep form the way it should be, but it is not the same as one-on-one on-line or in-person. S/he cannot see everyone all the time. Unless you are an experienced exerciser, it is important to be cautious.

I teach group fitness on-line. It is a challenge to instruct and keep an eye on participants in a gym setting–how much more so on a small screen. How to address this?

–Meet with the instructor one-on-one outside of class time. Many will do this for a fee, or if you are a regular participant in the class perhaps for free. Use that opportunity to ask questions and have your form checked.

–If you are unsure about an exercise, there are many videos available on-line by certified fitness professionals; if they are done well, they will show the move from different angles and give detailed explanations that may not be possible in a group setting.

–Watch your own screen or have a mirror nearby to check yourself. As you do an exercise, does your form match that of the instructor? I am a personal trainer and even I look at the screen to make sure my form is correct so that I am modeling properly for my participants.

–Engage the services of a personal trainer to help master the correct way to do exercises. This can be done in-person or virtually. I can do a much better job of ensuring proper form working with a client one-on-one than in the group setting. Do not think that working with a trainer in this way means that you have to be a client forever; it is not uncommon (and it is OK) to work with a trainer for a limited time.

Despite these warnings, virtual training can be an excellent option–especially for those who are more concerned about the spread of infection, as well as for older adults for whom getting in the car and going to a class might be more challenging. It is important, however, not to be lulled into thinking that form does not matter because “no one can really see me.” No one wants to be involved in an exercise regimen that will ultimately do more harm than good.