Protecting those Knees

As we age, we hear more and more about people requiring knee surgery or even knee replacement. While the knee is not the most complicated joint, it is one that gets a lot of use and bears a lot of weight. It is important to be cognizant of the proper form while exercising to avoid injury; in particular, doing lunges or squats the wrong way can put a great deal of pressure and stress on the knee.

When we talk about the knee, we cannot just talk about the bones (the femur, tibia, patella, etc.) but also about the tendons, ligaments, and cartilage. All of these are susceptible to strain and injury. Working with a fitness professional is one way to help ensure that knees stay healthier–or at least avoid serious damage.

A new study referenced in the most recent issue of IDEA Fitness Journal reaches some enlightening conclusions about the connection between exercise and the risk of physical harm to the knees. As a runner (although I run less now than I used to), I always worried about the risk to this all-important joint; I assumed that our knees were like tires: they last for certain amount of miles and then they need to be replaced! Researchers at the University of Southampton and University of Oxford (both in England) found that the benefits of exercise–even for the frail and elderly–outweights the risks with regard to our knees. The study focused on the likelihood of developing knee osteoarthritis from physical activity. 5000 participants were followed for 5-12 years and the data suggests that neither the amount of energy spent in physical activity or the length of time were associated with a risk of developing arthritis.

This is good news; my last blog post focused on a related idea. Many people are afraid to work out for a variety of reasons–including injury. Studies show that the more information that can be shared with those beginning an exercise regimen, the greater the chances of success; that information should include debunking myths and stressing the benefits of exercise (versus the risk of not) as well as setting proper expectations of what the process will be like.

My knees have not worn out (yet), but it is good to know that it does not appear that years of running and physical activity might lead to knee arthritis in the future. One more reason to go boldly ahead keeping myself fit for whatever the future brings.