How Do I Know If I’m Making Progress?

A client recently asked me how it is possible to know if progress is being made while engaged in an exercise program. There are a number of ways to answer this.

Progression (from the word progress) is an important concept in fitness. It refers to ways that exercises are made more challenging. For instance, the amount of weight being lifted can be increased. The number of reps can be increased. An element of difficulty can be introduced like doing an exercise on one foot. In general, an exercise program needs to take into account progression so that “progress” can be made. If the same exercises are done over and over with the same intensity, duration, and resistance, there is little reason to expect that there will be increased muscle mass or endurance…or whatever the particular goal might be.

How can it be tracked? There are apps on phones and devices like Fitbits that can monitor and record workouts. Even without such technology there are ways to follow this. For example, if it took 15 minutes to walk a mile at the beginning of April and at the beginning of May it took 12, that is progress. If a person is running and they are able to go further each time (by adding a block or lap), that is also progress. These kinds of progressions are most effective when they are recorded in some way–even if on a piece of note paper.

By the way,progress may not always appear in the mirror as bigger muscles or greater definition or a smaller waistline–although those can be signs of progress. Sometimes the best indicator is a sense of feeling healthier, more fit, or energetic.

Progress does not just happen. It needs to be figured into the equation. A fitness professional is trained how to introduce this into a workout in a safe, effective way. This is particularly important for older adults. On the one hand, older adults may be more prone to injury by overtraining or training the wrong way. On the other hand, older adults may go to easy on themselves and not really effect change. A trainer–especially one who has certification to work with older adults–will know how to strike that balance.

Most importantly, know what your goals are. Once those are established it is easier to set a course that includes progressions so that you do not go from 0-60 in 10 seconds…and then hit a brick wall. Put those progressions in place, monitor results, and re-evaluate as necessary. And always remember, if it does not challenge you, it will not change you!

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