How Do I Know If I’m Making Progress?

A client recently asked me how it is possible to know if progress is being made while engaged in an exercise program. There are a number of ways to answer this.

Progression (from the word progress) is an important concept in fitness. It refers to ways that exercises are made more challenging. For instance, the amount of weight being lifted can be increased. The number of reps can be increased. An element of difficulty can be introduced like doing an exercise on one foot. In general, an exercise program needs to take into account progression so that “progress” can be made. If the same exercises are done over and over with the same intensity, duration, and resistance, there is little reason to expect that there will be increased muscle mass or endurance…or whatever the particular goal might be.

How can it be tracked? There are apps on phones and devices like Fitbits that can monitor and record workouts. Even without such technology there are ways to follow this. For example, if it took 15 minutes to walk a mile at the beginning of April and at the beginning of May it took 12, that is progress. If a person is running and they are able to go further each time (by adding a block or lap), that is also progress. These kinds of progressions are most effective when they are recorded in some way–even if on a piece of note paper.

By the way,progress may not always appear in the mirror as bigger muscles or greater definition or a smaller waistline–although those can be signs of progress. Sometimes the best indicator is a sense of feeling healthier, more fit, or energetic.

Progress does not just happen. It needs to be figured into the equation. A fitness professional is trained how to introduce this into a workout in a safe, effective way. This is particularly important for older adults. On the one hand, older adults may be more prone to injury by overtraining or training the wrong way. On the other hand, older adults may go to easy on themselves and not really effect change. A trainer–especially one who has certification to work with older adults–will know how to strike that balance.

Most importantly, know what your goals are. Once those are established it is easier to set a course that includes progressions so that you do not go from 0-60 in 10 seconds…and then hit a brick wall. Put those progressions in place, monitor results, and re-evaluate as necessary. And always remember, if it does not challenge you, it will not change you!

Weights? We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Weights!

Pushups

As the pandemic wears on, more and more people who used to be regular gym-goers are realizing that it has been 18 months since they have stepped foot in a fitness center. Some have found other ways to keep fit, but many have simply stopped working out altogether. It is a sad reality, and one whose end is not necessarily in sight.

One of the issue stopping people from working out at home is that they lack the equipment found in gyms. I have been working virtually with clients (first for a local gym, and then in my own business “At Home Senior Fitness”) since the earliest days of the shutdowns in 2020. By now, many of my clients have at least a couple of dumbbells or perhaps some resistance tubes. Even so, I am able to put together workouts for clients that use body weight alone. This is especially helpful when clients are traveling and cannot bring equipment with them.

Is a body weight workout effective? The answer is a definitive yes. To paraphrase the classic film The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, “Weights? We don’t need no stinkin’ weights!”

Of course, there are certain principles that should be followed. As in workouts using weights/resistance, the best results occur when there is a pattern of progression. In other words, either increase the weight being used, decrease the rest period between sets, increase the number of reps and sets, etc. In a body weight fitness regime increasing the weight does not figure in, so it involves getting more creative. There are many ways to make the workout more challenging: single limb exercises, changing the angle, increasing tempo, introducing hybrid exercises, etc.

It should go without saying that this applies to resistance training, but it is also the case in cardio workouts. Treadmill, ellipticals, and stair climbers were created to replicate already existing body movements. Instead of a treadmill, one can walk or run on a street or trail; speed can be varied and (depending on where you live) so can incline. Running or jogging can replace ellipticals, although the impact on joints is much greater. Bicycle riding can replace a stationary bike, and one can simply climb stairs! We have become so accustomed to thinking that we have to go to the gym, but it is possible to be fit–and even “ripped”–without using equipment.

Finally, a body weight workout regime requires a lot of creativity. Every piece of equipment in a gym is designed to work a certain muscle or muscle group; these muscles can be exercised without that equipment as well, but it may take a fitness professional to help adapt them. Finally, a personal trainer can help to ensure that a body weight workout is not only effective and safe, but also fun!

Weights are great, but their absence should not be a reason for avoiding a workout. The good Lord gave us all bodies, and we can use them creatively to keep ourselves fit and healthy.