Too Much (or Not Enough) of a Good Thing

The most recent issue of AARP Magazine [August/September 2022] addressed the issue of what we assume to be good habits to stay healthy that can actually be harmful in some cases. I would link the article, but it is not yet posted to their website; it is entitled “Good Habits That Might Age You Prematurely,” by Leslie Goldman.

Goldman addresses five habits that, in general, are good but call for either moderation or at least some counterbalance.

  1. Staying out of the sun. I recently blogged about this; when we are outside it is very important to use proper sunscreen and other protections to prevent skin damage and/or skin cancer. Avoiding the sun altogether, however, can have negative effects. Circadian rhythms (similar to our biological clocks on a daily basis) are set by the sun; they keep all our systems and organs on 24-hour cycles. When we have little or no exposure to the sun, those rhythms can get messed up and make sleep difficult; sleep, of course, has many benefits. Goldman suggests at least 15-30 minutes each day outside in the morning and late afternoon/early evening, or to make use of a light box at a consistent time each morning.
  2. Eating nutrition bars. As the author notes, it may sound healthy but many are loaded with sugar; the same is true of smoothies and fruit juices. This can lead to all kinds of problems like high blood pressure and heart disease. How can you know if your bar is healthy? Add up the number of grams of proteins and the number of grams of fiber. If that number is higher than the number of grams of total sugar, it is not problematic. Consider other ways to get protein that are not loaded with sugar or overprocessed.
  3. Drinking when you are thirsty. If you wait until you are thirsty, you are too late. Estimates are that 70% of adults between the ages of 51-70 may be chronically dehydrated. This increases the risk for all kinds of problems from urinary tract infections to colon cancer to diabetes. Goldman suggest drinking enough so that you have to urinated every 2-3 hours; additionally, it is a good idea to eat foods that have high water contents like celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, watermelon, and peaches.
  4. Walking every day for exercise. I have blogged about this too. Walking is great, but as we age we need to make sure that we vary our exercises and include weight training as well. Weight training helps to rebuild muscle mass that is lost with aging and can also strengthen bones. By the way, the more muscle you have the greater ability you have to store water (see #3 above). Get at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise each week, or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise. Work in 2 days of strength training; a fitness professional can help you do this safely and effectively.
  5. Constantly wearing supportive shoes. This was a shocker to me; and I have blogged about this too. Our feet send messages to our brain that help us to keep our balance. If we wear shoes all the time with lots of padding and support, our brain does not get enough sensory stimulation from the feet–and the nerves can lose sensitivity too. Goldman recommends going barefoot for 30 minutes each day, especially while doing activities where you move around so that the whole foot gets stimulation.

As always, if you have questions or concerns, consult with a medical professional that you trust. It is true that moderation and balance are important guidelines–not only in our relationships, leisure pursuits, and diet, but in our other health habits as well!

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