10,000 Steps a Day? For You (Such a Deal) 30% Off!

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Most of us have probably heard the guideline that we should be taking at least 10,000 steps a day to help maintain health and fitness. Where does that number come from? According to a recent article on http://www.nbcnews.com, it was a number picked by a Japanese company in the 1960s seeking to sell pedometers.

The article discusses the results of study published this month in Jama Network Open, a publication of the American Medical Association. The research indicates that the number may more realistically be around 7,000 steps to get the same health benefits; namely, people who achieved that goal (7,000) were 50-70% less likely to die in the next 10 years! Of course, 10,000 does not have a negative effect. The smaller number, however, may seem less daunting to some people; on the other hand, maybe it is a better idea to have people aim for 10,000 and only hit 7,000.

The most recent guidelines are that we should exercise (or be physically active) for a minimum of 150 minutes per week; the range goes up to 300 minutes per week, and can be a combination of different kinds of exercise and levels of intensity. Someone who is running 8-10 minute miles can get by with the lower number (150) as opposed to someone who is walking at a pace of a 20 minute mile (perhaps 300 is better). Of course, there are many factors that at play here; this new research adds to our understanding of how much walking can figure into these numbers. Previously, there were not any solid studies; this new research suggests 7-13 thousand steps/day is the optimal range.

For those who fret about hitting their step goal each day, this may be some welcome news. As always, consult with medical and fitness professionals to find what is best for you.

In the meantime, remember, a journey of a thousand miles begins with 7,000 steps!

Is Walking “Good Enough?”

Corona walks 11/...

One of the top activities for many people during this pandemic has been going for a walk. It gets us out of the house; being out in the open air is good for us and carries a low risk for transmission of COVID-19. Many people, however, want to know if walking really “counts” as exercise, or whether is is “good enough” to provide health benefits.

An article came out on Monday on Insider that addresses this very issue. Here is the link: https://www.insider.com/is-walking-low-impact-movement-enough-exercise-to-improve-health-2020-12,

It is worth read; the author and the individuals quoted bring forth useful information. There is even a little summary at the beginning of the article. First, if you are tracking exercise using a device or other means, walking definitely counts; it can be any kind of walking (around the block or to the fridge!), as those who aim for 10,000 steps a day know. Second, walking can boost immune function and reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Third, keeping active in bursts during the day can have benefit; those of us who are stuck at home most of the day (working or otherwise) can break things up with a quick walk outside or around the home. Finally, the article encourages us to do what we enjoy; if a person doesn’t like the stationary bike but likes walking, it makes sense to choose walking that one actually has a shot at doing on a regular basis.

The article goes into greater depth and discusses as well what walking can and cannot accomplish. I always tell folks that moving is definitely better than not moving. That being said, moving that involves a little more intensity is usually better than activities that do not. Walking at a slow pace and making frequent stops (like taking a dog for a walk) is better than sitting on the couch, but walking without the pet (alone or with a friend/family member) at a more brisk pace is even better. There is also the option of a kind of High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) that I have done with many clients; walking for 2 minutes at a regular pace, then 20 seconds fast, and repeating the cycle is an example of this.

Most importantly, the article stresses, find what you like and enjoy. Intense exercise that we never do is not as helpful to our health as a moderate exercise that we carry out on a regular basis.