COVID-19 Silver Lining

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The current pandemic has been like a giant cloud hanging over the planet. No one quite knows when or if it will drift away. We don’t know where or how hard it will rain or storm. Even so, some have found silver linings in those clouds. For example, many older adults became proficient with technology that previously seemed too overwhelming. Others took the opportunity to make exercise and diet a priority. The aftermath of the killing of George Floyd has awakened in many a greater sensitivity to the suffering and injustice endured by those around them. People are trying to make sense out of all of this and find a positive along the way.

In Victor Frankl’s book Man’s Search for Meaning, he argued that we cannot fully control what happens to us; there is a great deal of uncertainty and randomness in our world. What we can always strive to control is how we react to what happens. Even in places where it appears that we have very few choices (in his case, the Concentration Camps of the Holocaust of WWII), we can choose how to face adversity.

I have been thinking about the silver linings that have come out of this pandemic for me. There are more than a few for sure–some trivial and some more weighty. I had a chance to try making some baked goods; the dandelion rosemary shortbread was a win, the citrus carrot cake…not so much. I got to spend a lot more time with my wife–a big deal since we spent the first 10 years of our 12-year relationship living in different cities. I got to read some great books: In the Garden of Beasts, Unbroken, Letters to My Palestinian Friend, A Little Life; I got to watch some interesting movies and shows The Hunters, Citizen Kane, Pandemic.

The biggest win for me, was really upping my game in the realm of Personal Training. I got certified as a TRX coach (have been wanting to do that for 2 years). I completed a number of CEUs. I did personal research on a number of issues that my clients are facing. I learned how to use a new high-tech device that measures body fat in a sophisticated way that will help me guide my clients to live more healthfully. I started my own FB Group to do a daily online workout; I am hoping to restart that in some shape or form. I learned how to effectively train clients over Zoom. I created workouts day-in and day-out for clients who had no equipment at home at all–did you know that a couple of bottles of cabernet savignon are quite effective for doing Triceps Kickbacks?

I feel like I’ve had a chance to really “hone my craft,” and I look forward to using what I have learned to ensure that my clients see the results they want and deserve. I feel more confident about my skills. As someone relatively new to the Fitness Industry, I feel like I have “arrived.”

From a financial standpoint, having the JCC close just as my business was really beginning to build was a real setback. I did feel sorry for myself for a few days. Then I realized, I cannot control what this virus will do…what I can do is control what I want to do with the extra time I have available. I feel like I am coming out of the pandemic better than when I went in. I have found my silver lining. I hope we can all do the same.

As If We Ourselves Were in Egypt

Alive

This evening at sunset begins the Hebrew month of Nisan; if it is clear tonight, you can see (or not see) the new moon.

Nisan is a very special month in Jewish tradition. It is the month that contains the holiday of Passover, the celebration of the Hebrew’s liberation from Egyptian slavery millennia ago. The entire month takes on certain observances–most of which eliminate mournful practices.

There is a lot of getting ready for Passover: cleaning, purchasing special foods that can only be eaten at Passover, getting rid of the food that cannot be eaten (because it contains leavening), and preparing for the festive Seder meal. It is a lot of work, complicated further by the current COVID-19 situation. It is difficult to go out and purchase the special foods. Many of us are used to hosting a lot of people for Seders; that won’t be happening. The whole thing is rather disconnecting.

There is also spiritual preparation for the holiday. For weeks leading up to Passover, there are liturgical additions on Shabbat that get us thinking about the meaning of the holiday. It is, of course, about freedom and redemption–and not just from Egyptian slavery, but every day in our lives and in history. We live our lives trying to make the world a better place–redeeming a broken creation and trying to restore the correct balance. In essence, this is what God was modeling to us when were brought out of Egypt.

It is difficult for many to relate to the story of Passover. It took place so long ago and so far away. Most people sitting at the Seder (unless they are Holocaust survivors, former Soviet Refuseniks, or former inmates), have never experienced slavery. We don’t really know what it was like for our ancestors. The Haggadah (the book we use to guide us through the Seder) tells us that each participant must see him/herself as if s/he personally went out of Egypt. How do we do that?!?

This year is the first time that many are getting a tiny taste of what it might have been like (with obvious big differences). We now know what it means to be cooped up in a small place unable to leave. We know what it feels like to not have a sense of what tomorrow may bring. In short, we realize that our destiny is not totally in our hands; this is always the case, but now we sense it more strongly.

This is not Egypt. There are parallels, though, and perhaps we can draw on them to make the festival more meaningful. We may not be able to control events around us right now (can we ever?), but as Victor Frankl pointed out, we always have a choice about how we want to face what is going on. Can we find purpose in this moment? Can we draw meaning from the inconveniences and suffering of COVID-19? The choice is ours.

We can sit and sulk. We can grieve. It is appropriate to do so. For a while. Then we must accept what is going on around us; we must adjust to whatever the new normal will be. We must rise above it. We must find ways to connect with others through new media. We must continue to take care of ourselves and the vulnerable in our midst. We must find ways to enrich ourselves. We must become more sensitive to the suffering of those around us.

None of us was in Egypt, yet every year we focus on the story to draw inspiration, courage and wisdom. Right now, we are not in Egypt, but that shouldn’t stop us from learning and deriving meaning from our experience today.

Happy Nisan! And stay healthy!