Not Going Back to the Gym?

Chicago-approved exit sign

The New York Times ran an article at the beginning of the year that addressed the changes that had occurred in the fitness industry–in particular with fitness facilities–since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. It focused on individuals who decided to forego the gym and were willing to pay thousands of dollars for personalized workouts. The examples in the article were somewhat extreme, but they point to a significant trend that has been addressed in later publications as well.

Gyms are having a tough go of it. During the time when gyms were shut down, people invested in equipment to use at home; some spent heavily on products like Mirror, Peloton, weights, mats, etc. I have an elliptical in my home now too! The spending spree continued when gyms re-opened but much of the public was reticent to re-enter them. I work with some clients who have nothing more than a pair of 2-pound dumbbells, but I also have clients with an array of weights, exercise balls, resistance tubes, and cardio equipment such as recumbent bikes and treadmills. With so much invested at home, why return to the gym…and start paying those monthly fees?

Still, there was something that was missing. For many people, it is hard to stay motivated at home. There are those that worry that they may not be using the right equipment or using it correctly. Enter people like me, entrepreneurs who have stepped into the personalized virtual and in-person training domain. I started my business just under a year ago and left the gym where I worked a few months later; my schedule is almost completely full and the inquiries continue on a regular basis.

What I offer is more convenient, less costly, and no less effective. There is no monthly gym membership to pay in addition to my personal training fee; I have much lower overhead and can pass those savings along to my clients. There is no commute–either I come to the client’s home or we Zoom–which is an extra bonus for older adults. There is also no worry about whether the guy coughing on the next treadmill over has been vaccinated or not.

This business model is one that I imagined before the pandemic arrived; the events of the last 18 months only accelerated the demand for it. Offering a niche service–training only older adults–has put me in even higher demand. The next step is finding ever more innovative ways to meet seniors in the virtual and “real” world to help bring fitness to an often-overlooked demographic knowing that many senior adults will never go back to the gym. I am proud of the work that I am doing–and, more importantly, of the results my clients are seeing.

Not going back to the gym? You are part of a growing trend. The next question is: what are you doing to keep yourself fit and healthy as the pandemic drags on…and in the years beyond it?

Overcoming the Fear of Virtual Training

Eat garbage, then work it off

Does this picture make you think of what online or virtual training is like? It is true that there is no shortage of online workouts that a person can do featuring people who don’t look like they actually need the workout…and who happen to be shirtless or in a bare midriff. I get why folks would be a little put off by these workouts. The people on the screen look nothing like most of us. Is that why so many of us are afraid of online workouts?

Even so, we are at the point where “waiting out the pandemic” before going back to the gym may not really be an option. Ohio’s governor, Mike DeWine announced yesterday that gyms in the state can re-open after Memorial Day Weekend (not sure what’s magic about that date); on the same day, the Mandel JCC where I work as a Personal Trainer informed us that we would not go back to one-on-one in-person by-appointment-only training at the gym on May 18 as previously hoped. In fact, leadership reported that it could be June before we do this. And, even if a gym re-opens, what does that mean? I’ve blogged about this before; it won’t be the same old gym that you remember from early March.

It is time to get over the fear of virtual workouts. Many personal trainers are depending on their clients (current and future) to do just that since our livelihoods depend on it (no less that other local businesses depend on us). Some people just feel that virtual training is just not the same and they are correct; but post COVID-19, is anything the same?

Guess what? There are some advantages to virtual training.

First, no one else can see you (unless you are in a Zoom group workout) so if you mess up or poop out, no one will judge you…except maybe your dog. In my daily online workouts, I always give modifications so that folks will feel that they can build up to the more difficult exercises. No one knows if your doing the modifications or only 8 reps instead of 12. The downside, of course, is that if your form is off or you’re just plain doing it wrong, there is no way for the instructor to know…and you could end up injuring yourself, which leads me to my next point.

Second, if you are working with a trainer one-on-one, we are well-versed in how to do exercises correctly as well as giving you the kinds of workouts that will help you to reach your fitness goals whatever stage of life you are in. Does a 70-year-old retiree need to do a 30-minute butt blaster? Probably not, but would exercises aimed at balance, mobility and fighting the loss of muscle mass be helpful? You bet. A trainer can provide that–even online–tailored especially to your needs and wants.

Third, you have more equipment to work with than you realize. You may look around the house and think, “I don’t even have a jump rope!” Trainers are able to provide effective workouts even if you have ZERO equipment. I have done workouts using dish towels, canned goods, and rolls of toilet paper, and they were tough! Most can rely on our own body weight…although one of my clients who has no dumbbells used a bottle of Cabernet Savignon and a bottle of Merlot instead of weights–brilliant! I never thought that I’d say the line: “while doing those overhead triceps extensions you may want to have the cork facing up….”

Fourth, when you work one-on-one over a platform like Zoom or FB Live, the distractions are minimized. There aren’t other people in the gym to distract you. You don’t have to wait to get on a piece of equipment and lose your momentum. It is hombre a hombre and it can be a very effective way to get things done.

Fifth, the technology is not as difficult as you think. If you have a tablet or laptop, you most likely have a camera and speakers built right in. If you only have a desktop, there are a number of good and relatively inexpensive webcams for purchase online. The programs are designed to make it so that even a Technorsaurus Rex like myself can make it work. I have clients in their 80s who are using Zoom all the time. Your trainer can talk you through it…and then you can “visit” with friends and family too.

Of course, if you want, you can wait it out. By then, however, how much muscle tone will you have lost? How much will your stamina have decreased? How much weight will you have put on? How will all this affect your mood, your sleep, and your energy levels?

What are you afraid of?