Pickleball: Yay or Nay for Older Adults?

Have you caught Pickleball fever yet? It seems like it is spreading faster than COVID. Pickleball is an indoor or outdoor racket/paddle sport where two players (singles), or four players (doubles), hit a perforated hollow polymer ball over a 36-inch-high net using solid faced paddles. The two sides hit the ball back and forth over the net until one side commits a rule infraction. Although the sport has been around since the mid-1960s its rates of participation have grown significantly over the last few years–aided in no small part by the pandemic, which made outdoor activities more popular.

I have been interested in picking up the game myself even though I am not real good at sports that involve a ball; I am more of a runner, cyclist, fitness kind of guy. There are concerns, though, about how safe the game is for older adults like myself. According to a recent article in The New York Times, there were 19,000 pickleball injuries in 2017 (before the sport boomed), with 90% of those being over the age of 50.

The most common injuries are those related to the rotator cuff tendon in the shoulder according to the Baylor College of Medicine. Other injuries include miniscus tears, tendon ruptures, and exacerbation of arthritic knees. The best way to prevent injuries is to warm up before a game; such a warm-up should include some light cardio like jogging, cycling, or walking briskly to the point of a light sweat, as well as stretching. A cool down should include additional stretching. Of course, if there is soreness after playing, cold can be applied and over-the-counter anti-inflammatories can be taken. If a condition persists, it is best to consult a medical professional.

All that being said, should older adults avoid pickleball? While 19,000 seems like a lot of injuries, it is well below other sports such as basketball or riding a bike (which is where most injuries are for those over 65), there are many advantages to pickleball. It is relatively easy to learn and more and more venues are available to play. It also has benefits for the cardiovascular system; it provides a good aerobic workout which can help lower reduce the risk of high blood pressure, stroke, and heart attacks. Pickleball is great for boosting hand/eye coordination and can help with balance. Perhaps most important, Pickleball is fun and social; this means that participants enjoy the experience and are therefore more likely to stick with it, making the game part of a good strategy for senior fitness.

Will I give it a try? If the opportunity presents itself I will. I am aware of the risks and will take the appropriate steps to keep myself away from injuries. It sounds like fun and a great workout!

400 Followers!

It has been 3.5 years since I began this blog, and now I have reached the milestone of 400 followers. To mark the occasion, I reread the blog that I posted when I hit 200 followers.

I noted back then, that I had little idea how the whole blogging thing worked. Originally, the blog was supposed to deal with the intersection of Judaism and physical fitness, but it veered more into fitness for older adults a couple of years ago, reflecting my personal training business At Home Senior Fitness.

What is new since I hit 200? My business was still in its early stages and I was struggling to get new clients; now I have a waiting list! I am now a regular contributor to Northeast Ohio Boomer where my column on fitness for seniors appears in each issue. I have taught classes for local organizations including a synagogue, Village in the Heights, and a group supporting individuals and families with Parkinson’s Disease. I have been interviewed for print media, radio, and a podcast!

It will be interesting to see where I am when I get to 600 followers. Currently in development is digital content from my brand, and the strong possibility that I will expand my business to keep up with growing demand.

In the meantime, I will keep bringing you the lastest news, tips, and advice for how to stay healthier and more fit as we age!

Thanks for reading, and feel free to offer feedback and spread the word!

How Much Dairy Should Older Adults Have?

Saturday at sunset begins the Jewish holiday of Shavuot–known in English as the Feast of Weeks or Jewish Pentecost. This festival recalls the harvest of the first fruits in the Land of Israel as well as the receiving of the Law at Mt. Sinai.

Over the centuries, the custom has developed to eat dairy products on Shavuot; cheese blintzes and cheesecake are particularly traditional, popular, and tasty. How did this custom develop? There is no single answer. One explanation has to do with a verse from the Song of Songs (4:11), where it states “honey and milk are under thy tongue;” since this book is seen as an allegory of the love between God and the Israelites, the honey and milk are thought to refer to the Torah, whose words are always spoken (by the tongue). Another interpretation is that the journey to Mt. Sinai was so arduous that the Israelites did not bring animals to slaughter and eat–it would have been too much bother–but rather ate only dairy leading up to the Revelation. Yet another explanation is that until the Torah was given at Mt. Sinai, there were no laws about what was acceptable to eat (the dietary/Kashrut rules are in the Torah); in order to not transgress God’s will, the people only ate vegetarian and dairy. Whatever reason you like best, it all adds up to a tasty and rich holiday.

I will admit that I usually overdo it a little on Shavuot when it comes to the cheesecake and ice cream. It got me wondering just how much dairy is “right” for older adults. Most sources recommend 3 servings daily (each serving being one cup). It seems like a lot; what is the rationale behind this? As we age, the need for calcium becomes all the more important; it helps us to keep our bones strong. We know that one of the biggest fears of older adults is breaking bones, because the healing process is slower and can lead to complications. When it comes to calcium, there are few sources that pack as much punch as dairy products.

Unfortunately, many older adults have a hard time digesting dairy products. There are also many vegans who do not consume them at all. What alternatives exist to get the proper amount of calcium in their diets? Many non-dairy foods contain calcium: soy products (like tofu, tempeh, edamame), legumes (such as beans, peas, lentils), nuts, seeds, some grains, and other vegetables. There are also some drinks such as oatmilk and orange juice that may come enriched with calcium.

Is the real reason why we eat dairy on Shavuot because God knew that the Israelites would need strong bones to wander for 40 years in the wilderness? There is no way to know for sure, but it is about as plausible an explanation as those put for by Jewish tradition over the generations.

In any case, as we grow older, we must be diligent about maintaining the proper levels of calcium in our diets. Maybe that should be the 11th Commandment!

It’s Not Your Age That’s Slowing Your Metabolism

Metabolism

Older adults are used to hearing that a natural part of the aging process is that our metabolism will slow down; the metabolic rate is the rate at which our bodies burn calories in order to keep our vital systems functioning and allow us to do the things we do on a regular basis. As we age, most of us find that slowly but surely our weight increases; it seems that as our metabolic rate decreases (assuming everything else stays the same, like exercise and diet) the pounds begin to add up. We are just not burning calories at the rate that we used to.

An article in Science, reports that our assumptions are actually incorrect. Our metabolism is not slowing as we get older simply because we are aging, but rather because a number of other factors come together to decrease our levels of activity. Leading a more sedentary lifestyle due to work, home responsibilities, technology–and even the pandemic–is behind those decreasing metabolic rates.

A recent article on http://www.cnn.com, explains the issues and concludes that this research is good news for older adults. If aging is behind our decreasing metabolism, then there is nothing we can do to reverse its effects; we are simply stuck in a downward spiral. What the research shows is that we actually have it in our control to maintain and increase our metabolism as we get older.

The article suggests four main strategies:

  1. Be active throughout the day. Many of us spend hours at a time at a desk (or on a couch) with little movement. Even little bursts of activity throughout the day can raise metabolic rates.
  2. When you exercise, do the right types for maximum metabolic effect. HIIT exercises are recommended because they raise the metabolic rate and keep it elevated even after the workout is over; check out my blog post on HIIT for more info. Additionally, strength training (working with weights and other types of resistance) has a similar effect.
  3. Make sure to get enough protein in your diet and keep hydrated. The simple act of eating increases our metabolic rate because it takes calories for the digestive system to do its job; consuming proteins (especially after a workout) can help to build muscles which cause us to burn more calories. Drinking water–aside from its other positive assets–can raise our metabolic rate too.
  4. Get plenty of rest. Not sleeping enough can lead to a myriad of health problems. Allowing our bodies to adequately refresh and re-energize can help counteract the negative effect of these maladies. It is recommended that adults get at least 7 hours of sleep each night.

Metabolic rate decreases are not a done deal as we age. There is much we can do to counteract the effects of being sedentary, not exercising enough, eating a poor diet, and being overtired. It is all in our power–not part of some process beyond our control. This is good news indeed!

HIIT Me Baby One More Time

Stopwatch

No, this is not about a Britney’s Spears song. HIIT stands for High Intensity Interval Training; this is a form of exercise that combines short bursts of high energy exercise (usually for a fixed amount of time) with longer periods of rest or lower intensity exercise (also for a fixed amount of time). Generally, HIIT is used with aerobic or cardio workouts, but it can contain elements of resistance as well.

I have blogged previously about HIIT workouts. In the past, many in the fitness industry felt that HIIT workouts were inappropriate for older adults, but the most recent research shows that it can actually increase a person’s lifespan. As a general rule, the only people who should avoid HIIT workouts are those with injuries, women who are pregnant, or women who are 3-6 months post-partem (but consult your own doctor for specifics).

HIIT is an effective way to work with seniors who may not be able to sustain longer periods of aerobic activity, but who can still tolerate and benefit from intervals of higher intensity exercise. I often begin my workouts with older adults using a TABATA: 20 seconds of exercise followed by 10 seconds of rest with 8 sets incorporating two different exercises alternating. With other clients I may do a 5-minute HIIT comprised of 1 minute of low intensity walking, stationary bike, treadmill, or jogging-in-place followed by 20 seconds at a higher speed; this cycle is repeated 3 times with a minute of low intensity at the end. For a longer workout, the periods of high and low intensity can be adjusted; for example, one could do 2 minutes of walking followed by 30 seconds of easy jogging. As a client progresses, the higher intensity periods can be lengthened.

The advantage of HIIT is that if it is done for a long enough period (opinions vary), it can raise the heart rate and resting metabolic rate for an extended amount of time–as long as 24 hours! The body can continue to burn calories long after the workout is over. Even for shorter workouts, let’s call them “quickies,” it has the advantage of pushing the client to work more intensely but for a period of time that is manageable. A person may not be able to run for one minute straight, but they may be able to run 3 sprints of 20 seconds separated by a minute or two.

I will continue to explore ways that I can use HIIT workouts with my clients. Research shows that there are no downsides except that they should be limited (at least for HIIT workouts of longer than 20 minutes) to three times a week to prevent overtraining and/or boredom which would lead to demotivation to exercise. For my older clients, there are many advantages, most important among them that it can add to a person’s life expectancy.

Have You Got Time for a Quickie?

1971 ... 'five minutes to nuclear self-destruct.'

We all know that we should be exercising. Many also know that the recommendation is 150 minutes of moderate to intense physical activity each week; for many people this works out to a half-hour workout five times per week. For many more people, however, it works out to no workout whatsoever; it is difficult to find those 150 minutes each week so rather than try to fit it into a schedule, we give up.

Research shows that there is actually benefit in doing a brief (or even very brief) workout. If it is impossible to find a half hour all at once, 10 minutes three times a day or five minutes 6 times a day–or any combination thereof–seems to work just as well. Even if the 150 minutes is not reached, there is always a benefit to working out no matter the length of time.

Of course, what happens during that “quickie” workout matters. AARP reported on this very topic on its website. There should be at least one minute of intense exercise during the workout that elevates the heart rate. Many, including myself, recommend incorporating High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) into a brief workout. For instance, a 5-minute walk (dancing, stationary bike, climbing stairs, etc.) could include 1 minute at a regular pace, 20 seconds fast, 1 minute back at regular pace, 20 seconds fast, 1 minute regular pace, 20 seconds fast, followed by 1 minute of cool down; that equals five minutes total with 1 minute total of high intensity. Such a workout could be scaled up to 8, 10, 15 or more. It also a good idea to mix it up and not do the same exercise every time; some light weights or even body-weight exercises can be intermingled with cardio too.

When it comes to taking care of ourselves, we all have plenty of excuses why we do not do a better job. A big one is the perception that it takes too long; we are simply too busy to devote the time to exercise. Short workouts take away that excuse. They are brief and can be very effective.

After all, who doesn’t have time for a Quickie?

A New Venture!!!

I am thrilled to announce the opening of my new venture: At Home Senior Fitness, LLC.

At Home Senior Fitness offers at-home and on-line personal training and fitness guidance for older adults. Individual sessions and the overall fitness plan are personalized and focus on maintaining and increasing strength, mobility and balance. All workouts are conducted in a safe setting under the direction of Certified Personal Trainer, Functional Aging Specialist and Rabbi, me! AHSF is not a one-size-fits-all service, but rather meets clients where they are in terms of fitness, motivation, equipment available–and in their own homes within Cleveland’s east side suburbs or virtually. AHSF is the fitness solution for older adults seeking convenience, safety, excellent customer service, and results.

I look forward to working with you and receiving referrals you might have.

Visit my website for more details. http://www.athomeseniorfitness.net

What Are We So Afraid Of?

fear

I was working with a client earlier today who qualifies as an older adult; she is one of those folks who comes to the gym but says that “it is not really her thing.” She cannot really understand why people do it…and if it weren’t for her husband, I don’t know if she would be there at all. As we were discussing this topic (not for the first time), her husband chimed in, stating that the reason why he works out is to avoid “the walker.”

Older adults who do work out are motivated by a number of factors. For some, they really enjoy it–especially the social aspect of being at the gym. For others, it is just a habit that was picked up earlier in life. And for others, it is motivated by fear. And this is not necessarily a bad thing.

A recent study commissioned by the home healthcare company, Home Instead Senior Care Network, surveyed older adults about their biggest fears. The top 3:

  1. Losing Independence.
  2. Declining Health.
  3. Running Out of Money.

Losing independence is complicated, because it can actually be a result of #2 and #3. Other research I have seen shows that the biggest fear is loss of cognitive function; they dread a body that still works and mind that is no longer there. This would certainly result in loss of independence. In any case–especially in the USA–independence is a core value and it is not surprising that we fear losing it as we get older; we do not want to have to rely on others.

Declining health is also complicated. It’s not just about dementia, but about being incapacitated, in pain or greatly impaired. Older adults envision a retirement or later life filled with activity and enjoying the well-earned fruits of one’s labors. It is understandable that we fear that our health may rob us of these things.

Finally, running out of money–also complicated. Many adults have not provided adequately for retirement, even though they think they have. With seniors living longer and longer, what might have been enough money even ten years ago may be underestimated today. No one knows what the status of Social Security will be, but the system is being stressed with more seniors and a declining birthrate. Never mind leaving an inheritance, we worry that we won’t have enough for medicine, food and housing.

So, should we live in fear? The good news is that it is almost never too late to begin addressing these fears. This leads us back to my client; the choices we make today will affect what our later years will look like. An hour or two at the gym can be the difference between independence and having to rely on family, friends or “the system” later in life. While it is true that there are certain medical conditions that we cannot anticipate, many of the health issues in our society are the result of poor lifestyle choices. We can always improve our diet, our exercise, not too mention quitting smoking and limiting our alcoholic consumption. Running out of money? If we take care of ourselves now, we decrease the likelihood that chronic and devastating illnesses will hit us later on; this not only has health implications, but monetary ones as well.

FDR said that “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” Each of these fears can be addressed. We do not need to let them scare us into inaction; on the contrary, they should spur us to the kinds of activities that will help us avoid the things we fear the most.

We are living longer. Let’s not approach older adulthood with fear. Let’s face it with a sense of bold optimism!

HIIT for Seniors?

A little reminder

What it is HIIT? It stands for High Intensity Interval Training, which means working out at a lower intensity for a given amount of time, followed by working out at a higher intensity for a given amount of time, in a cycle. For example, a person could walk for two minutes, run for 30 seconds, walk for two, run for 30, etc. HIIT has gotten a lot of hype because the research shows that it is an efficient way to work out.

HIIT now encompasses many modes of exercise. There are HIIT aquatics classes, weight training, and cardio applications. The results are that one can get the same benefit as a regular workout, but in a compacted amount of time…and the benefits can continue for a while after the workout ends. Research shows that when we raise our heart rate significantly, we can continue to burn calories at the higher rate for several hours. That is efficient! And that explains the popularity.

But is it OK for seniors? AARP ran an article on this topic last year: https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2018/high-intensity-interval-training-workout.html. Being a trainer “of a certain age,” I clipped out of the bulletin and took it into the gym, figuring I’d give it a shot.

For many of my hour-long sessions I start out with the beginner’s HIIT suggested in the article: 3 minutes low intensity, 20 seconds high intensity, 2 minutes low, 20 seconds high, 2 minutes low, 20 seconds high, and then 2 minutes of low–for a total of 10 minutes. Of course, how to do HIIT with seniors will differ with each person. A couple of my clients have advanced to the point that we now do 30 seconds high intensity at each interval. Depending on their ability, balance and agility, I use walking on the track, elliptical, NuStep, or a stationary bike. It is sometimes scary at the beginning since many seniors are not used to “pushing it,” for fear of a heart attack, or because they’ve been told that they are too old for that intensity of exercise.

Trainers and seniors alike should be cautious, but from my experience, HIIT can increase cardio capacity, affecting both endurance and power. As my clients progress, I will continue to tweak the formula. Although skeptical at first, I am a believer in HIIT for older adults when done appropriately. I have seen the results myself!

I’m a certified Functional Aging Specialist!

Readers may recall that I attended the IDEA Personal Fitness Conference – East at the beginning of April in Alexandria, VA. My main reason for going was to do the all-day training for the Functional Aging Specialist Certification. It was a great training (and I got CEC for it), but still needed to take three on-line exams in order to be certified.

I hoped that I would be able to pass all three by the end of April, but wasn’t sure if I could pull it off. Being laid up after foot surgery left me with more time on my hands so I decided to be productive. Many hours of reading and watching videos and I passed the last exam today! With four hours left in April!

As I blogged about earlier, FAI is in the forefront of fostering better practices and research in the realm of fitness for older adults. The focus is less on building muscle strength and more on working to keep older adults able to do the things they want and need to do. In other words, we address the wants and needs of our clients in order to keep them functional and independent. There is a greater emphasis on building muscle power (which helps with getting out of a chair or going up the stairs) as well as improving balance and reactivity time.

This will be very interesting for me since this is such a diverse population. Every senior presents with a different fitness and health history; there are 60-year-olds who cannot walk without assistance, and there are 80-year-olds running marathons. This kind of training requires more intense planning and specialization based on getting to know the client really well.

I will keep you posted on how this part of my “business” progresses. In the meantime, I look forward to a little celebration of my accomplishment!